Goal Experiment Summary Report: Survey Pop

After the first attempt at setting up a goal experiment on my Angular app didn’t work, I conducted research on how to correct this issue.

I found an Angular service called angular-google-analytics which provides a way to use Google Analytics on Angular Apps.

It can be installed using Bower and there are a lot of configuration options that you can put into the App.js file including event tracking.

When I tried adding the service to my application I was experiencing errors so I decided to go to Plan B which is running an experiment on my User Journal.

I created two variations of the article “Content Experiment on Survey Pop.” The original version has a text link to the Survey Pop application and the variation has a green button that links to the Survey Pop application.

content-variations

What were the results of your Content Experiment? Did they match what you thought would happen?

After four days of data collection, there were some preliminary results available.

experiment-data

So far, the variation is outperforming the original with 2 conversions in 4 experiment sessions. The original also had 2 conversions but in 6 experiment sessions. The conversion rate for the variation is 50%, versus 33% for the original.

CNN can now project that variation 1 will be the winner of the experiment. Just kidding. Google Analytics gives variation 1 a 68.9% probability of outperforming the original.

My hypothesis is that the green button is helping to encourage people to click on the link because it stands out against the white background of the page. I predicted that the green button would increase conversions, and so far the data supports this prediction.

Have you been tempted to use less ethical means of converting users? (e.g. Misrepresenting links, spamming, false keywords, etc.)

I have not been tempted to mislead the visitor to increase conversions. This seems counterproductive because if the user doesn’t convert by their own accord, they probably won’t be willing to make a purchase or anything else that requires some effort.

This question reminds me of the tactic of popup windows to ask the user for an email newsletter signup. This is controversial because it can be annoying to the user, but there is probably good data that this tactic increases conversions significantly. If I decided to use this tactic, I might delay the popup so only people who have spent some time on the website would see the popup, instead of getting a popup right when they first visit the website.

Are these tools (Google Analytics) usable? Have they been challenging for you?
It was great learning about how to implement content experiments on a website. It seems pretty simple to implement on a site although I was not able to get the experiment to work on an Angular application because Google thought that there were only one or two pages on the site instead of the actual page count (6-8 pages). I wasn’t able to get the google analytics service to work on my app without errors. I think it would help to use a service like Prerender.io which creates a static version of each page and makes Angular apps more “Google friendly.”

Content Experiment on Survey Pop

I set up a A/B test on the homepage of Survey Pop to test whether adding a button increased visits to the survey page.

First I created a new angular route with Yeoman for my angular app called mainvariation and copied the homepage HTML to mainvariation.html. There is a slight change between the two versions which is adding a button to the link “View the Survey”.

home-page-variations

I then set up a new experiment in Google Analytics which included adding a goal of a visit to the survey page. I set the goal of visiting the survey page as the criteria for a successful outcome. I then added the JavaScript code to the head section of my Index.html.

Google Analytics confirmed that the code was working on the page I am testing. I solicited test subjects at the course Slack channel and GA tracked 10 sessions in the first day.

validate-code

After 6 days I rechecked the results of the experiment and there were still zero goal conversions for both variations.

experiment-results

After some investigation, I found that Google Analytics thinks that my app only has two pages.

content-drilldown

Since, Google Analytics can not tell that the survey page is a different page than the home page of the app, it can not determine when a goal has been completed. I haven’t found a workaround for this issue yet.

Content Experiment on Survey Pop

I set up a A/B test on the homepage of Survey Pop to test whether adding a button increased visits to the survey page.

First I created a new angular route with Yeoman for my angular app called mainvariation and copied the homepage HTML to mainvariation.html. There is a slight change between the two versions which is adding a button to the link “View the Survey”.

home-page-variations

I then set up a new experiment in Google Analytics which included adding a goal of a visit to the survey page. I set the goal of visiting the survey page as the criteria for a successful outcome. I then added the JavaScript code to the head section of my Index.html.

Google Analytics confirmed that the code was working on the page I am testing. I solicited test subjects at the course Slack channel and GA tracked 10 sessions in the first day.

validate-code

After 6 days I rechecked the results of the experiment and there were still zero goal conversions for both variations.

experiment-results

After some investigation, I found that Google Analytics thinks that my app only has two pages.

content-drilldown

Since, Google Analytics can not tell that the survey page is a different page than the home page of the app, it can not determine when a goal has been completed. I haven’t found a workaround for this issue yet.

Adding Goal Tracking: CharlesSipe.com

I am adding goal tracking to my personal blog CharlesSipe.com.

charles-sipe-website

I would like to track the goal of clicking on a link to view my current resume but that might not produce enough data for the purposes of this assignment. Instead I will track the goal of spending more than three minutes on my blog. This will tell me whether people are immediately bouncing or spending some time reading my blog.

In July my blog had 580 users visit the site with an average session time of just 54 seconds.

I added a goal of spending at least 3 minutes on the site and set an arbitrary $1 value for experimental purposes. The test showed that there was a 8.33% conversion rate in the last 7 days.

goal-setup

goal-setup-2

Easy peasy.

After a couple days I checked the status of the goal tracking.

I had 6 goal conversions on August 12th but 0 goal conversions on August 13th. It also shows the page where the conversion took place in the conversion report page.

Analytics Report: Ranked Blogs

For this project, I am reviewing the Google Analytics of a website project I built with the help of a mentor last year at Rankedblogs.com. It is an Angular application with the purpose of ranking the best blogs in different categories based on votes and website data from the Moz API.

My predictions about the traffic:

My site is most popular with women, ages 25-45, from the US.
Most of my users come from links from blogs.
The most popular search terms that lead people to my site are “ranked blogs”, “dad blogs”, and “code school blogs”.
The most popular page on my site are my top dad blogs.

Findings:

A majority of traffic is from the United States with 137 sessions (67.49%) in the past month. The second largest country is the United Kingdom with 26 sessions (12.81%) in the past month.

Most users are currently coming from direct traffic (89 out of 203 sessions). Referrals was the second largest source of traffic (50 sessions) followed by organic search (38 sessions) and social (26 sessions).

The most popular search terms were not available. 37 out of the 38 sessions from search were “not provided.” The one session with data had the search term of “top mom blogs 2016.”

The most popular page is the craft blogs with 100 sessions in the last month (29.41% of sessions). This was followed by mom blogs with 57 sessions (16.76%), dad blogs with 38 sessions (11.18%), and farming blogs also with 38 sessions (11.18%).

The average time on site was 3 minutes and 55 seconds while the bounce rate was 79.31% and the exit rate was 59.71%.

I learned that you have to enable demographic reports in your Analytics account to view the demographic data from your site.

demographic-reports

I also enabled search console to get additional data like the devices visitors were using.

search-console