Mobile Usability Test

chanUser mobile test on Chan Restaurant:  www.chanseattle.com

 

I chose to re-test Chan Restaurant’s webpage on mobile. To read my review of their desktop site, check out: Usability Test.

Test Script

Mobile Test Script
Mobile Test Script

Testers

  User1 User2 User3 User4
Gender Male Female Female Female
Age 33 48 47 23
Ethnicity Israeli White Mixed White
Profession IT D&T Comp HR

I had each user review Chan’s webpage on an Iphone 6s to allow for consistency in format and functionality. I also took into consideration Krug’s tips for “The Logistics of Mobile Testing” from Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited, Chapter 10. I tested the wireless mirroring app,  Reflector 2, but found that it had a delay so by the time it caught up, I was on another tab or scrolling in another area and it didn’t record my actions earlier. It could’ve been my laptop and connection so to be safe, I observed the participants as they reviewed the site and took notes. Like the first usability test, the participants spoke out loud as they moved through and made comments on how it was going for them and what they liked or didn’t like. User1 participated in the test for the desktop version so that I could ask comparison questions on the two versions of their site. User 2-4 did not participate in the previous test and was not familiar with Chan’s webpage.

First Impression

The users thought that the home page looked “clean” and modern with the photos but User 3 and 4 got lost when they clicked into the Instagram photos that were in the middle of the page. User4 said that she had seen worse mobile sites and thought it was a good layout generally. User 1 and 2 thought that the carousel allowed them to swipe through the photos but it did not. User1, who was familiar with the desktop version, found the carousel photos and Instagram photos in the middle to be redundant and the loading time for the gallery was slow.  Users 3 and 4 commented the style for the “Chan” logo was odd because they read it as “Chain” or a colon.

Instagram photo gallery
Instagram photo gallery

Tasks

For the first task-Find the location of Chan, all users except for User3 found the location by scrolling down on the main page. User3 clicked the navigation toggle box on the right to the About and then found the address scrolling down. They all mentioned that they like the map feature except User2 got stuck in the map when she clicked on it and couldn’t scroll further down but she saw the address beneath it. Users 2-4 mentioned that they would prefer the contact information and hours on the top or in the nav toggle as it’s own which is similar to the comments of most of the users who reviewed the desktop version.

Location on the bottom
Location on the bottom
Navigation toggle box
Navigation toggle box

For the second task-Find the menus. All users found the menu easily by clicking on the toggle box and selecting Eat. User2 felt that the loading of the menu pdf took too long and said “it’s broken” and moved on to the next task. User 3 and 4 commented that it was small and then clicked on the pdf to zoom in on the items. Once they figured how to zoom in, they were good with the menu but User4 was lost for a moment because it opened another tab and she had to go back. User1 did not like the pdf function.

The third task to locate their craft cocktails was also completed easily because they were comfortable with the toggle and clicked on Drinks. It also had a pdf menu. I did notice that when the users clicked on the photos of the food and drinks, a subtitle of the food and drink name appeared (although it showed two subtitles). The desktop testers didn’t see the names of the food and drink when they reviewed the photos and that was a recommendation for the last review.

Pdf of Menu
Pdf of Menu

Drink

The last task-make a reservation, seemed easier for this group. User2 wasn’t able to find the information because the map interfered and she stopped scrolling further down which is where the “no reservations” was listed. User3 thought the scrolling ended where the social media icons were listed when she reviewed the main page but then saw the “no reservations” under the Eat page. User 3 and 4 found the information but also commented that it did not pop out or should be on the top.

No reservation on the bottom
No reservation on the bottom

Insights/Recommendations

Chan’s mobile site appealed to all of the users. User1 preferred the mobile version to the desktop. The recommendations I have would be similar to their desktop review. 1) Include a happy hour menu mention but to have the menus be mobile friendly rather than pdf.  2) Use different text or highlight the “No Reservations” to stand out from the other information and move it with the contact information to the top or in its own navigation tab on the toggle box. All the users said that they would more likely lookup restaurants from their cellphones rather than desktops because of convenience and would look for a restaurant while outside. If the site is slow or they can’t find information from the mobile site, they wouldn’t wait to use a desktop but rather move on to another option. Therefore, mobile usability is important not only for Chan but any restaurant.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *